Talpa, One of Mexico’s Pueblos Mágicos Near Puerto Vallarta

We went on a tour from Puerto Vallarta to two of Mexico’s Pueblos Mágicos in the Sierra Madre: Mascota and Talpa.

This was pricey and probably not the best way to do it, as the bulk of the time (roughly 7 hours) was spent on the road. Mascota was a quick run through the sights after which we were stuffed back in the van to head off to Talpa.
Sign to Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierras After our lunch in Talpa we begged to have a free hour just to roam around and explore the town itself. One of the other tour members was aghast, “But what are we going to do for an hour?” Besides, they reminded us, they had to be back in Puerto Vallarta by 7:00 for dinner.

But the rest thought that it would be fun just to wander and so we got to actually see this town, as long as we were back at the van by 3:30 as it would take three and a half hours to get back to Puerto Vallarta.

So here is Talpa, a magical town, without a single church or town square photo in the bunch!
Bright wall with a red door in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierras Stained wall with a wooden door in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierras Floor tiles in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierras Bright alleyway leading to a rusty garage door in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierras Bright wall with a blue door in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierras Bright wall with a faded Coca-Cola opener in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierras Bright blue interior behind a barred gateway in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierras Bright red flowers draped a blue door in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierrasThis hotel looked interesting, next time we go we might stay here! The sign reads: Rooms with bathroom, TV, fan and wireless internet (wifi). A ‘cama mat.’ is a cama matrimonial or double bed. 180 pesos is less than ten dollars US at the current rate of exchange.
Hotel sign in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierras Talpa is famous for its candy making, mostly from the many fruits that grow in the region. Imagine all these colourful buildings accompanied by the fragrant smell of guavas, the fruit harvest for November.
Canned fruits and candy making at a candy store in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos Canned fruits in a shop window in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierrasSome Mexican candies: tamarind fruit roll (dark maroon), occasionally spiked with hot chile powder; guava fruit roll (light brown); and cajeta (goat’s milk caramel) with a fudge-like texture and pecans on top!
Poster for the Feria de la Guayaba (guava) in Talpa during November 11 to 22 – lots of activities and candies to give you energy to get through them all.Poster for the Feria de la guayaba (guava) in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos Speaking of activities here’s the best part – we passed a building with loud music issuing out the door and down the street. “It sounds like a live band,” Al said, “let’s go and see.”Talpa musicians It was a live band and a dance troupe as well, practising line-dancing to a catchy Mexican tune. I started videotaping but when they saw us they dragged us onto the dance floor. Then a woman started videotaping us as we attempted to do the ‘cumbia’ and then a Mexican polka (Norteño) which almost did us in…
Talpa dancers Talpa dancers Breathlessly we ‘polkaed’ out of there and then spotted a bright tiled stairway that we couldn’t resist dashing up.
Bright walls with a tiled stairsway in Talpa, one of Mexico's Pueblos Magicos in the Pacific high sierras “We have three minutes to get to the van,” Al gasped as we ran down the hill, the bells of the church tolling the half hour. And just as the last bell tolled we made it to the van!

There are three Pueblos Mágicos up in the Sierra Madre Occidental above Puerto Vallarta on Mexico’s Pacific Coast: San Sebastián, Mascota and Talpa. They can be reached either by taking a somewhat pricey tour from Puerto Vallarta, by renting a car, or, with more difficulty, by local bus which only runs three times a day. In this case I would recommend staying overnight in one of these charming towns as all of them have a range of accommodation.

Advertisements

6 responses to “Talpa, One of Mexico’s Pueblos Mágicos Near Puerto Vallarta

  1. What a great place for photographs, and that live music must have been fun. As for ‘what are we going to do for an hour’ – what a lack of interest and imagination!

  2. Pingback: Mascota, One of Mexico’s Pueblos Mágicos Near Puerto Vallarta | Albatz Travel Adventures·

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s