Exploring Botany Bay & Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, Canada

Exploring Botany Bay & Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, Canada.

We usually enter this magical area via Botany Bay, a small bay with interesting rock formations. On the rocks with a view of the island at Botany Bay near Port Renfrew on Vancouver Island, CanadaThe local rocks are an intriguing compound rock of black bits that look like a fine layered slate, embedded in a blue-grey cement, butting up against worn grey stone with undulating formations from wave action. visual texture on some Botanical Beach rocksThis rock inspired a painting and I have a lot more shots of this crazy rock. rock at Botanical BeachA detail of my painting inspired by the rock.Painting of a Botanical Beach rock with black glass from a broken car windowTo be able to fully enjoy these beaches the tide has to be out. The Tide Table at tide-forecast.com for Port Renfrew is one place to check on this critical factor.Tide Table for Port Renfrew (& Botanical Beach)Between Botany Bay and Botanical Beach is a forest trail. If the tide is out far enough you can get to either beach along the shoreline as long as you don’t mind scrambling up and down rocks. If you get caught by the incoming tide there are ‘escape routes’, which are also there in case of tsunami warnings. There are also signs warning of ‘Bears in Area’ and ‘Rogue Waves’ which can sweep the unsuspecting out to sea.Botany Bay Escape TrailThe trail is a much safer route, unless you run into one of the magnificent bears, and uniquely beautiful besides. A twisted tree on the trail between Botanical Beach and Botany BayA twisted tree on the trail between Botanical Beach and Botany Bay near Port Renfrew on Vancouver Island, CanadaAt Botanical Beach the waves have carved holes in the rocks.Tide pools at Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, CanadaThe holes/tidepools usually contain life forms of some sort or the other – one of the reasons it is called Botanical Beach.
Tidepools and potholes at Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, CanadaA Chiton mollusc in a tidepool at Botanical Beach.
A Chiton mollusc in a tidepool at Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, CanadaIf the Chiton looks prehistoric that’s because many of this mollusc species are extinct, existing only as fossils. The shells next to it are Chinese Hat Shells.A chiton mollusc in a tidepool at Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, CanadaThe Chinese Hat Shell (Calyptraea chinensis) is a small sea snail. Chinese Hat Shells at Botany Bay near Port Renfrew on Vancouver Island, CanadaA seaweed maybe? Or is it a sea creature?
Seaweed in a tide pool at Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, CanadaA purple sea urchin.purple sea urchin at Botanical BeachSeagrass waving in a tide pool.Tidepool with green seaweed at Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, CanadaA tide pool that looks like a cauldron full of mussels along with some goose barnacles, the latest in gourmet treats. (Montecristo Magazine calls these guys the bad boys of speciality seafood.)Tide pool full of mussels at Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, CanadaAlong with the tide pools there are also other strange rock formations that perhaps only an artist could love! Barnacles surround an unusual rock formations at Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, CanadaSweeping view of Botanical Beach.Sweeping view of Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, BCBotanical Beach and Botany Bay, located by Port Renfrew, represent the end of the Juan de Fuca Trail, something that to me far outshines the better-known West Coast Trail that it connects with.Map showing the beaches along the Old Island Hwy from Sooke to Port Renfrew

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7 responses to “Exploring Botany Bay & Botanical Beach on Vancouver Island, Canada

  1. What a lovely spot – interesting rocks, interesting trees, and interesting tidepools – it’s now on my bucket list! Thanks for sharing!

  2. Pingback: My Exhibition at Britannia Art Gallery in Vancouver is Coming Up! | Elizabatz Gallery·

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