Parrilladas, the Argentinean Mixed Grill of Carne, Carne, Carne

Parrilladas are the famous Argentinean mixed grill of carne, carne, carne.

At an Estancia (Ranch Estate) where they were preparing the grill for our first parrillada.Dogs waiting patiently for scraps from a large parrillada at an estancia in the countryside outside of Buenos AiresThere were a lot more parrilladas on that trip to Argentina. And what goes on the grill? Carne, carne y más carne.A large parrillada at an estancia in the countryside outside of Buenos AiresCarne in the form of chorizo, criollo and morcilla (blood) sausages, these ones hanging in the market in Tucamán, Argentina.Carne in the form of blood, chorizo and criollo sausages for a parrillada BBQ hanging in the market in Tucaman, ArgentinaRibs destined for a parrillada being wheeled down the street in Buenos Aires.Wheeling in the carne for a parrillada in a restaurant in Buenos Aires, ArgentinaSometimes a whole pig went onto the grill. Pigs for a parrillada BBQ hanging in the market in Tucaman, ArgentinaA pig with a cig! A pig with a cig in the market in Tucaman, ArgentinaThis parrillada in Tafí del Valle has goat, a local speciality along with the usual sausages and chicken.A parrillada in Tafi del Valle in ArgentinaBBQ goat is shown off at a parrillada in Tafí del Valle in Argentina. Bbq goat is shown off at a parrillada in Tafi del Valle in ArgentinaIf there is any outdoor space in an Argentinean home it will likely contain a parrillero, a small backyard grill on which to cook a parrillada. This is one in Buenos Aires. The beef and chicken had been marinated for a long time in chimichurri, a marinade/salad dressing made of vinegar, garlic, oregano, parsley, red pepper flakes and oil. Yummm.
A small household Parrillada in Buenos Aires, ArgentinaThis parrillada is in Uruguay, where they call it asado, and it actually has a few vegetables(!) tossed in, something I never saw in Argentina.

A parrillada of a lot of meat (and a few peppers) in Uruguay

credit: Patricia Martín

Gauchos drinking mate and playing the guitar in the Argentine Pampas with a parrillada beside them, circa 1890. From Spanish Wikipedia: Grupo de gauchos tomando mate y tocando la guitarra en la Pampa Argentina durante la segunda mitad del s. XIX. Notar como en la parte inferior derecha de la foto se observa un “costillar” puesto a asar en el modo llamado “a la cruz”.

Gauchos drinking mate and playing the guitar in the Argentine Pampas with a parrillada beside them, circa 1890

Unknown author – Archivo General de la Nación, Wikipedia

A old-fashioned outdoor-style parrillada, ironically at a glitzy restaurant called ‘La Estancia’ in the city of Buenos Aires, where they are roasting in the same style called “a la cruz” ‘to the cross’ as above.

A old-fashioned outdoor-style parrillada, ironically at a glitzy restaurant called 'La Estancia' in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina

credit: Felipe Loro

In most cases the parrillada would be accompanied by a simple salad, bread and an excellent Argentinean red wine. Malbec, the signature grape of Argentina, is velvety, smooth, dark berry/cherry, and a perfect accompaniment for all that meat. Young gaucho pouring some Malbec wine during our day at an estancia in the campo (countryside) outside Buenos Aires, Argentina

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