The Patina of Copper in Denmark

There was so much verdigris in Denmark that I thought they must have had a ton of copper mines in the vicinity.

But as I learned from the Bronze Age exhibits – bronze being a mix of copper and tin – this was not true. What the Danes did have was a lot of sea-faring people with well-established trade routes who brought the valuable metals from other countries all over Europe.

Verdigris copper statue of two ancient Vikings playing a horn instrument called a Lur in Copenhagen, Denmark. Verdigris copper statue of two ancient Vikings playing a horn instrument called a Lur in Copenhagen, DenmarkStatue of a knight on a horse, made of weathered copper (verdigris), in Copenhagen.Verdigris copper statue of a knight on a horse in Copenhagen, DenmarkSculpture of a winged wheel with a crown, made of weathered copper, in Copenhagen.Sculpture of a winged wheel with a crown, made of weathered copper (verdigris), in Copenhagen, DenmarkCopper fountain of storks about to take flight in front of a copper-roofed building in Copenhagen.
Copper fountain in front of a copper-roofed building in Copenhagen, DenmarkA copper-clad verdigris watchtower on a bridge in Copenhagen. A verdigris watchtower on a bridge in Copenhagen, DenmarkA twisted dragon steeple building all have weathered copper roofs in Copenhagen.A twisted dragon steeple building all have weathered copper (verdigris) roofs in Copenhagen, DenmarkStatue of the winged god Mercury, made of weathered copper (verdigris), in Copenhagen.Statue of the winged god Mercury, made of weathered copper (verdigris), in Copenhagen, DenmarkA bronze verdigris statue of the huntress Diana with a deer in a park in Copenhagen.
A bronze verdigris statue of the huntress Diana with a deer in a park in Copenhagen, DenmarkWinged dragon sculpture. Winged dragon sculpture, made of weathered copper (verdigris), in Copenhagen, DenmarkEven a news stand gets a copper topper, just like all the surrounding buildings. A news stand and the surrounding buildings all have weathered copper (verdigris) roofs in Copenhagen, DenmarkCopper lanterns sporting angels on top decorate a church in Copenhagen, Denmark.Copper lanterns with angels on a church in Copenhagen, DenmarkA copper plaque in the church in Køge, a medieval town just south of Copenhagen. A copper plaque in the church in Køge, a medieval town in DenmarkA copper gargoyle cheekily sits atop a building in Aarhus, Denmark. A copper gargoyle cheekily sits atop a building in Aarhus, DenmarkCopper pot and wooden vats in an old brewery in the 1864 village of the large open-air museum in Aarhus
Copper pot and wooden vats in an old brewery in the 1864 village of the large open-air museum in Aarhus, DenmarkVerdigris copper cladding of the hull of the Frigate Jylland in Ebeltoft, one of the world’s largest wooden warships. The copper kept barnacles and other sea-life from clinging to the bottom, thus meaning that the bottom of the vessel did not have be scraped regularly, which would have been a problem with a boat of this size.The verdigris copper cladding of the hull of the Frigate Jylland in Ebeltoft, DenmarkMore of Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Metal.

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