Thorvaldsen Museum of Sculptures in Copenhagen, Denmark

Thorvaldsen was a predominant Danish sculptor who worked in the neo-classical style popular in the 18th century.

He lived for most of his life in Rome and was heavily influenced by the classical styles.
A plaster model of the sculpture of the man Maximilian I riding a horseMany of his sculptures are of Roman gods and goddesses, or from stories such as Jason and the Golden Fleece.
sculptures are of Roman gods and goddesses or from stories such as Jason and the Golden FleeceA plaster model of a bust at the museum. A marble bust at Thorvaldsen Museum in Copenhagen, DenmarkThe entire museum was designed by Thorvaldsen to highlight his sculptures and statues.Thorvaldsen designed the entire 'look' of the museum in order to highlight his neo-classical sculptures - this one of the goddess Venus with an appleMany of the sculptures on display are plaster models that were designed before the final statues were cast out of bronze or carved out of marble. Neo-classical style bust of NapoleonA statue of Gutenberg, the inventor of the printing press which brought books and their contained knowledge to the people. A statue of Gutenberg, the inventor of the printing press which brought books and their contained knowledge to the peopleAlthough I’m not crazy about this style of sculpture, I’m in love with the dark rich colours, elaborate ceilings and complex, almost art deco floors that he designed to complement his work.
Sculpture of a God Ganymede against a rich gold wallPainting of Thorvaldsen’s original studio containing masses of sculptures.
Painting of Thoraldsen's Studio containing masses of sculpturesRichly coloured hallway with doors leading through to a bust on a plinth. Richly coloured hallway with doors leading through to a bust on a plinthThe tiled patterns on the floor subtly reinforce the colour scheme. Richly coloured hallway with doors leading through the MuseumThe tiled floors have mosaic tiles arranged in complex geometric patterns. complex geometric, almost art deco, tiled floorsThere was an amazing variety of combinations done in these small mosaic tiles.
The Thorvaldsen Museum of Sculptures in Copenhagen has tiled floors in complex geometric, almost art deco, patternsThe ceilings are equally impressive, and again, deliberately designed to complement his art.
Barrel-vaulted ceiling in the deep blue of a night skyClassic barrel-vaulted ceiling and chocolate coloured walls lead into a sculpture of a man on a horse. I love the dense ultramarine blue on the window insets.Classic barrel-vaulted ceiling leads into a sculpture of a man on a horseElaborate cameo-like reliefs decorate this complex ceiling.Elaborate almost cameo-like reliefs on a ceiling in the Thorvaldsen Museum in Copenhagen, DenmarkStarting on the right, these small busts show the process of creating his statues and sculptures. They started with a base structure of small pegs on wires that indicate the different depths of the face, followed by a rough clay bust, which was then smoothed and formed the basis of a plaster cast.The process of creating these statues and sculptures started with a base structure of small pegs on wires indicating the different depths of the face, followed by a rough clay bust, which was then smoothed and formed the basis of a plaster castAgain from the right, the plaster cast was refined and then measured using plum lines to start working on the final sculpture of marble. The plaster was refined and then measured using plum lines to create the final sculpture of a bust of a womanThe final bust of a woman Vittoria in marble.The final bust of a woman Vittoria in marbleMore about our trip to Denmark & Sweden in 2018.

3 responses to “Thorvaldsen Museum of Sculptures in Copenhagen, Denmark

  1. Pingback: Beneath my Feet: Tiled Floors from Around the World | Albatz Travel Adventures·

  2. Pingback: Leading Lines from Around the World | Albatz Travel Adventures·

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