Street Art is Everywhere in Christiania, the Freetown of Copenhagen

Christiania was a former military base that was occupied in the early 1970s by hippies squatting in the abandoned barracks.

It has had many ups and downs in its history, and just lately has become the number 4 tourist destination on Trip Advisor. Its location just across the water from downtown Copenhagen means there is pressure from developers who are eyeing the now valuable land.

But for now it remains colourful and independent, and filled with murals, graffiti and architecture that all made me smile.Star plus graffiti in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkWe wandered across a small bridge and ended up in an area that appeared to be somewhat industrial. Or perhaps anti-industrial?Graffiti in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkThe Letter R, a sculpture in front of row housing. The Letter R, a sculpture in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkFrom there our walk meandered through a rural area along the water, past a lot of makeshift homes and broken-down boats, most bright with murals or graffiti.Boats and a floating home/shed in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkGraffiti on the side of an abandoned boat.Graffitied boat in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkThe path led into a wooded area with more conventional homes and these bright graffitied dumpsters.Bright graffitied dumpsters in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkPerhaps conventional isn’t the right word to describe these home/castles which are another form of street art. Secret castle in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkAnother home/castle, also decorated.House/castle in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkDetail of the three-dimensional frieze above one of the windows.Decorative house trim in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkThe bikes add a three-dimensional note to this mural on an old brick wall. A mural in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania. The bikes add another note.There were a lot of dumpsters and walls adorned with a mix of murals and graffiti.Banksy-influenced wall mural in the counter culture Christiania part of Copenhagen, DenmarkBanksy-influenced wall mural in the counter culture Christiania part of Copenhagen, DenmarkGraffiti in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkGraffiti on a dumpster in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkEven this burnt fence did not escape some mad painter’s frenzy.Graffiti painted on a burnt wood fence in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkThere was a town centre of a sort, also brightly painted, and full of shops, small cafes, people and the cheapest coffee to be found in the city!
Shop in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkA yellow wall with many small windows in Copenhagen's Christiania district, DenmarkA Christiania pale orange abstract in Copenhagen, DenmarkBrightly-coloured shop in the counter-culture area of Copenhagen called Christiania, DenmarkMore of the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Street Art.

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14 responses to “Street Art is Everywhere in Christiania, the Freetown of Copenhagen

  1. Quite an array of street art Elizabeth! I visited Copenhagen many years ago – probably before any of these were created. Interesting how times change

  2. Great take on this week’s theme, Elizabeth! I love the variety of art here and your impressions of this creative part of the city. I hope it doesn’t lose its character when it becomes hot real estate. But, I suppose it’s inevitable that new areas will spring up around the old.

    • My city, Vancouver, is going through massive changes and growing pains – I guess you can’t go back to the past but sometimes I would sure like to slow down all the changes – I have to assume the people of Christiania who have been there aren’t necessarily happy with becoming pricey and a tourist destination!

    • I didn’t realize there were guided tours; we just sort of meandered over a bridge and there we were. This is probably the best way to see something – all the history can be googled nowadays anyway…

  3. I thought it was forbidden to take pictures there. Have you seen any signs or have they given in by now? I was there a long time ago, about 15 years or so. Or did you work around the signs? 😉

      • When I was there, there were many notifications, and phones didn’t have good cameras yet. There was still a bit of that ghetto vibe. The place was raided by the police regularly. Everything changes, I guess.

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